The Treasure Valley doesn't miss a beat when a celebrity touches down at BOI.  A few weeks ago, Instagram started wondering what Jean-Luc Bilodeau was doing in Boise when he posted a picture outside "The Torch." 

Thanks to April Matson, a new friend I made while hosting her Q&A session at Treasure Valley Comic Con, I was able to share the news that the Baby Daddy star was in the Treasure Valley shooting a teaser for their feature film Marbles being shot in here next spring.  Mystery solved.

Frederick M. Brown, Getty Images

But there's another celebrity Instagram mystery that's gone unsolved since March.  Rob Lowe posted two pictures of he and his son Johnny in Boise on the social media network with little explanation.  At first, people assumed that the pictures posted on March 4th had something to do with his Fox series, The Ginder (set in Boise but filmed elsewhere), but then realized that the show had been canceled in May 2016.  The pictures were taken at the Boise airport and the Old Idaho Penitentiary.  People also claimed to have ran into the father-son duo at the now defunct Downtown Pita Pit.

Thanks to the Idaho Statesman, we finally know that their visit was part of shooting a new reality show called The Lowe Files airing on A&E. The show follows Lowe and his sons as they trek across the United States checking out mysterious stories and spooky legends. The series is a little premature for Halloween season, as it started airing earlier this month. The August 30th episode will take Lowe and Johnny inside the Old Pen to take a deeper look at the building's disturbing energy, horrors that happened there and with the help of a psychology of fear expert, help them understand what triggers fright in humans.  Oh...and they were brave enough to stay overnight in the potentially haunted old prison.

In it's 100+ year history, the prison was home to 13,000 criminals who faced brutally hot summers, bitter cold winters and terrible disease (thanks to the lack of proper plumbing and poor ventilation.)  The conditions eventually led to riots that destroyed the chapel, dining hall and damaged other buildings on the property before it closed in 1973. It's also the site of 10 of the 11 state executions that have taken place in Idaho's history.